Scenechronize

 

Scenechronize Web Application Suite

Active Accounts LoginScenechronize FAQ | Support

 How to Lock & Maintain Your Script

What Can These Apps Be Used For? Script Breakdowns, Scheduling Stripboards, Production Reports, Script Sides, Script Distribution, Script Watermarking, Crew Homepages, and much more.

Check out the Scenechronize YouTube Channel for instructional videos and more information!


SCENECHRONIZE IS NO LONGER PROVIDING FREE ACCESS TO THEIR FULLY FUNCTIONING CLOUD APP TO UCF FILM. THIS JUST MEANS YOU CAN NO LONGER SHARE YOUR SCENECHRONIZE SESSION ONLINE WITH OTHERS WITHOUT PAYING FOR THEIR SERVICE. IT IS STILL FREE TO USE THE CLOUD APP WITH OUT THE SHARING FEATURE.


Things You Should Understand Prior to Uploading to Scenechronize

1) Lock your script:

In order for Scenechronize to work properly your script must be in the industry standard Warner Brothers screenplay format (Final Draft uses this format, for example). Please make sure your script is the final, ready-for-production version before submitting it. You can always tweak dialogue, add scenes or omit scenes. But if you are planning on doing a page one re-write, do not submit to Scenechronize. Scenechronize will automatically add scene numbers for you, so you don’t want to submit a script, make major changes and then try to re-number all the scenes. The scene numbers are final once submitted to Scenechronize. You can still omit or add, but you can’t give the existing scenes new numbers.

2) Maintain scene number continuity:

With rare exception, you always maintain scene number continuity. Say scene 70 moves up in front of scene 69. You would revise it like this:

68.

 

A69. (the scene you moved)

69.

70. OMITTED

If you’re pretty far into pre-production, it may be helpful to include a note either with the script revision or on the page itself to point out the change, so a harried production designer (for example) doesn’t look at the “OMIT” and suddenly stop construction on a needed set. The “OMITTED” is a good place to put such a note:

70. OMITTED [This scene is now A69.] *

3) Renumbering when moving scenes:

Once you’ve locked a script for production, you must keep track of updates to it. That means keeping track of each revision by noting the version number on the front page of the script and on each page that has a change on it. A slug (header) appears at the top of every revision page, aligned vertically with the page number. The revision slug typically includes the date the revisions were circulated and the color of the pages in parentheses. It also means that you can’t just simply move scene numbers around. You have to renumber and add letters when moving scenes.  For example, if you need to insert a scene between 121 and 122, you number it A122. That is, lettered scenes go before the normal scenes. The great advantage to this method comes during shooting, when each new setup for a scene is given a letter. If you shoot a master and two close-ups for scene 100, they’re labeled 100, 100A, 100B. For our inserted scene, putting the letter at end would get confusing: it would read 121A, 121AA, 121AB. Whereas the preferred method would give us A122, A122A, A122B. Delivering a much clearer result. *

4) Revision marks:

Script revisions are marked with asterisks in the right hand margins of the revision pages. When many revision marks are present on a single page, or within a single paragraph or scene, the marks may be consolidated into a single mark. For example, if all the lines in a given passage of dialogue are marked, the marks can be consolidated into a single mark appearing alongside the name of the speaker above the dialogue. In the case of scenes, this single “consolidation mark” appears alongside the scene header. For pages, the consolidation mark appears beside the page number.**

* Source Credit- “Renumbering when moving scenes”“The Hollywood Standard” posts @ johnaugust.com

** Source Credit- “Screenplay Writing” post @ Filmmaking Technology